Kilt Jackets Explained

Kilt Jackets Explained

There are a number of styles of kilt jacket, and making a suitable choice can be confusing. This guide will help you understand the different styles available, and hopefully make your purchase decision a bit easier.

Quick Links

Prince Charlie Jackets

Argyll Jackets

Tweed Jackets

Doublet Jackets

 

VIew our full range of kilt jackets here.

 


Prince Charlie Jackets

Prince Charlie jackets are the most formal style of kilt jacket available in our store. They are the equivalent of a 'black tie' outfit and are traditionally worn with a wing collar shirt and bow tie. Occasionally, they are worn with a Victoria collar shirt and ruched tie to add a more contemporary look.

Prince Charlie Jacket

The Prince Charlie Jacket is usually made from heavy worsted pure wool fabric known as barathea. Generally, they are available in 13oz and 15oz fabrics, although lighter and heavier weights are available.

The Prince Charlie jacket is heavily decorated, featuring ornate buttons on the front, sleeves and on the tails at the rear, satin lapels and usually silk braided epaulettes. As such, it is usually only worn to special occasions such as weddings and formal dinners.

Prince Charlie jackets are normally worn with a matching 3 button vest, as such it's almost impossible to purchase one without a vest. The vest features the same level of decoration as the jacket, with ornate buttons and satin lapels. They may also be worn with higher fastening 5 button vests to compliment the ruched tie.

Prince Charlie jackets should be worn with full dress sporrans to compliment the formal nature of the jacket.

Top


Argyll Jackets

Argyll Jackets are versatile jackets which are the equivalent of a traditional dress suit. They are less formal than the Prince Charlie, but can easily be worn to both formal and casual functions alike. Traditionally they are more suited to evening occasions, while a tweed version of the Argyll would be worn to day functions.

Argyll Jacket

The Argyll Jacket is usually made from heavy pure worsted wool fabric known as barathea. Generally, they are available in 13oz and 15oz fabrics, although lighter and heavier weights are available.

While less formal, the Argyll jacket is still decorated, with ornate buttons on the pocket flaps and cuffs, but not on the back of the jacket. The lapels and epaulettes are usually plain and made from the same material as the jacket, although some manufacturers use a braided epaulette.

The Argyll jacket can be worn with a high fastening 5 button vest, but it is not compulsory and is really a matter of style and occasion, as such, vests are sold separately. Adding the 5 button vest can make the jacket slightly more formal, and suitable to wear with a Victoria collar shirt and ruched tie, while normally an Argyll would be worn with a standard collar shirt and regular neck tie.

Argyll jackets can be worn with either semi dress sporrans for more formal functions, or leather day sporrans for less formal occasions. Generally, full dress sporrans are not worn with Argyll jackets.

Top


Tweed Jackets

Tweed Jackets are the daytime equivalent of the wool Argyll jacket, and are particularly suited to outdoor daytime events.

Grey Tweed Jacket

They are usually made from durable tweed material with horn buttons, and feature the same construction as the standard Argyll jacket.

Similar to the standard Argyll jacket, they can be worn with an optional 5 button vest depending on the occasion, however, would generally only be worn with a standard collar shirt and neck tie.

Tweed Argyll Jacket

While less formal, the Tweed Argyll jacket is still decorated, with horn buttons on the pocket flaps and cuffs, but not on the back of the jacket. The lapels and epaulettes are usually plain and made from the same material as the jacket.

Tweed Argyll jackets are usually worn with leather day sporrans but can be work with a semi dress sporran for more formal occasions.

 

Top


Doublet Jackets

Doublet Jacket

Doublet Jackets are similar to mess jackets (military style jacket commonly used in the 30's as an alternative to the white dinner jacket), with buttoned gauntlet cuffs and some styles have no lapels. They are more typically worn with a lace jabot (a clothing accessory worn around the neck) and cuff set, and a high-buttoned waistcoat. The highland doublet is Jacobean in style and may date to that period or earlier.

They are traditionally made from velvet material but modern kilt doublets are more likely to be made with 100% wool, with satin lapels and may feature epaulettes.

Most kilt doublets have a row of silver heraldic buttons on each side and styles such as Montrose and Sheriffmuir are always worn with a belt over the jacket.

As doublet jackets are more traditional in style they are usually worn with full dress sporrans for formal occasions.

Top